skepticism

I Knew You Were Going To Say That

December 3, 2010

[Originally posted on SWIFT, December 1, 2010] In the current issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, a respected publication of the American Psychological Association (APA), veteran psychologist and sometime psi researcher Daryl Bem has published an ambitious paper describing nine experiments which he claims demonstrate precognition, the ability to know the future […]

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Believing in Santa

November 28, 2010

[Originally posted on SWIFT, November 24, 2010] At Dragon*Con earlier this year, I took part in the “Raising Skeptical Geeks” panel, moderated by Desiree Schell (of the “Skeptically Speaking” podcast), and joined by Adam Savage, Laura Phillips, LaVerne Angela Knight-West, Daniel Loxton, and Barbara Drescher. [You can find the complete audio of the panel discussion […]

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Eastwood’s “Hereafter” Offers More Questions Than Answers

November 16, 2010

[Originally posted on SWIFT, November 16, 2010] Whatever gets you through your life ,’salright, ‘salright. Do it wrong or do it right, ‘salright, ‘salright Don’t need a watch to waste your time, oh no, oh no. — John Lennon In “Hereafter,” Clint Eastwood’s latest directorial outing, three characters explore the impact of death — or […]

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Happy Hallowe’en, Harry

November 16, 2010

I have long been associated in various capacities with the  James Randi Educational Foundation [randi.org], where I currently serve as Chairman of the Advisory Committee to the President, D.J. Grothe. I’ve now begun blogging for SWIFT, the foundation’s blog site, and my first entry was about Harry Houdini, in honor of Hallowe’en, which is also […]

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The Honest Liar, Episode #13

June 28, 2010

In this interview recorded at the National Science Foundation for the National Capital Area Skeptic’s presentation of the Philip J. Klass award to him, Ray Hyman explores the intersection of skepticism, magic, and psychology throughout the course of his life. He talks about his experiences with spiritualist church services, including “question and answer” services purporting […]

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The Honest Liar, Episode #12

May 21, 2010

This week’s For Good Reason features an interview with my friend Paul Provenza, the celebrated comic and critic, who talks about his new book, Satiristas, a collection of interviews with leading contemporary comics, and which focuses on rationalist issues through the lens of transgressive and subversive comedy.. In this wide-ranging interview, Paul discusses the motivation […]

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The Honest Liar, Episode #10

May 7, 2010

Vic Stenger talks about the limits of science, and whether scientists should be critical of religion and the paranormal, or if such sorts of claims are out of the bounds of science, and therefore beyond criticism. He discusses the academic and spiritual career of Fritjof Capra, and his book The Tao of Physics and how […]

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The Honest Liar, Episode #9

April 16, 2010

Simon Singh details recent news regarding the libel case brought against him by the British Chiropractic Association for an article he wrote in the Guardian criticizing chiropractic. He talks about English libel laws, and explains why he says they are the worst in the Western world. He details how the recent appeals court decision in […]

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The Honest Liar: Episode #8

April 8, 2010

Derek and Swoopy discuss the growth of skeptical podcasting in the five years since they founded the influential podcast Skepticality. They talk about how hosting their show opened new opportunities for them.They explore the extent to which skeptical podcasts foster insularity within the skeptical movement, or succeed as outreach tools reaching new audiences for science […]

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The Honset Liar: Episode #7

April 8, 2010

Bruce M. Hood discusses why so many people believe in the supernatural despite the lack of evidence, explaining that it may have something to do with how our brains are wired. He draws a distinction between religious supernatural beliefs, which are culturally determined, and more universal secular supernatural beliefs such as mind-body dualism and causality. […]

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